Fall 2014 Undergraduate Courses

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Fall 2014 Drop/Add and Withdraw Dates

Tuition and Fees are due by the first day of class. 

Payment or a payment plan is required to avoid cancellation of registration and late fee assessment.

 

Fall 2014

Last day to drop for 100% refund or add a course(s)

Last day to drop a class or withdraw from all courses in a session (70% completion) and receive a grade of W NO REFUND

August 25 - December 17

September 4

November 7

Please check WebAdvisor for Fall 2014 nonstandard date courses for drop/add and withdraw dates.

 
Fall 2014 Undergraduate Courses       View Graduate Courses
course titlemodehrsinstructor
ACCT 210: Principles of Accounting IWeb3Margaret O'Brien
A study of fundamental accounting principles and procedures such as journalizing, posting, preparation of financial statements, and other selected topics. Accounting is emphasized as a service activity designed to provide the information about economic entities that is necessary for making sound decisions. Prerequisite: 24 semester credits completed or consent of instructor.
ARTD 245: History of GraphicsWeb3TBA
This course covers the development of graphics from their origins to contemporary practices. Students will be introduced to the designers that had major impacts on graphics and their innovations.
ARTH 211: History of World Art IWeb3TBA
Art and architecture in the historical and contextual development. The role of visual arts, including crafts, drawing, painting, sculpture and architecture, in the historical and cultural development of world civilization from prehistory through the 14th century.
BADM 220: Business StatisticsWeb3Dan Talley
This course introduces students to basic statistical methods. Otpics, with computer applications, unclude: descriptive statistics, probability, distributions, sampling, estimation and index numbers with emphasis on applications in business and economics. Prerequisite: MATH 102
BADM 310: Business FinanceWeb3Randall Harkless
Business finance is an overview of financial theory including the time value of money, capital budgeting, capital structure theory, divident policies, asset pricing, risk and return, the efficient markets hypothesis, bond and stock valuation, business performance evaluation and other financial topics. Prerequisite: ACCT 211
BADM 344: Managerial CommunicationsWeb3Lynette Molstad-Gorder
This advanced writing course is designed to assist students with the development and refinement of their communication skills. It stresses the factors underlying the composition of managerial communications, including organizational structure, reader analysis, and content quality for letters and memoranda, informational and analytical reports, and grant proposals. Prerequisite: CSC 105
BADM 350: Legal Environment of BusinessWeb3Brian Ahrendt
This is a study of legal topics as they apply to the business environment. Topics include an introduction to the law, the U.S. Court system, legal process, government regulation, and criminal, tort, and contract issues.
BADM 360: Organization and ManagementWeb3Zixing Shen
This course is a study of management, including the planning, directing, controlling and coordinating of the various activities involved in operating a business enterprise.
BADM 370: MarketingWeb3Deb Tech
This course introduces the student to the basic concepts and practices of modern marketing. Topics include marketing and its linkages to business, consumer behavior, marketing research, strategy and planning, product and pricing decisions, distribution and promotion decisions, marketing management, and evaluation and control aspects for both consumer and industrial goods.
BADM 425: Production/Operations ManagementWeb3David Peak
This course studies the basic tools of operations management with emphasis on decision-making models in production and planning. Such topics as decision theory, production planning and control, inventory control, materials requirement planning, project management, and quality control are covered. Prerequisite(s): BADM 220 or MATH 281
BADM 476: Marketing ResearchWeb3Cecelia Wittmayer
This course provides an in-depth study of the primary methodologies of marketing research. Emphasis is placed on collecting, analyzing, interpreting and presenting information for the purpose of reducing uncertainty surrounding marketing and management decision. Prerequisite: CSC 209, BADM 370 and BADM 220 or MATH 281
BADM 482: Business Policy and StrategyWeb3Rick Christoph
This course is designed to develop an understanding of strategy formulation, implementation, and evaluation. It involves integrating all functional area of business, analyzing the environment in which the firm operates, and choosing strategies that enable the firm to meet its objectives. Prerequisites: BADM 310, BADM 350, BADM 360, BADM 370, senior standing.
BIOL 101: Biology Survey IWeb3Nevine Nawar
Study of the nature, diversity, and classification of life; ecology; cells and cell cycles, mendelian and modern genetics evolution and evolution theory. Intended for those not majoring in biology. BIOL 101 Lab is required.
BIOL 101L: Biology Survey IWeb0Nevine Nawar
Laboratory experience that accompanies BIOL 101.
BIOL 323: Human Anatomy and PhysiologyWeb4Nevine Nawar
Study of the structure and function of the human body including interrelationships among body systems. Includes significant weekly laboratory exercises. Prerequisite: BIOL 101 or BIOL 151. BIOL 323 Lab is required.
BIOL 323L: Human Anatomy and PhysiologyWeb0Nevine Nawar
Laboratory experience that accompanies BIOL 323.
CIS 130: Visual Basic ProgrammingWeb3Jim McKeown
Fundamentals of programming using Visual Basic. Focus on problem solving, visual design and programming concepts. Topics include sequence, selection, repetition, procedures and functions.
CIS 245: Information Security FundamentalsWeb3Ashley Podhradsky
Introductory course in which students explore the principles of information assurance, with emphasis on current threats and vulnerabilities to develop an information security plan to mitigate risk. Information security and assurance issues are explored and a multidisciplinary approach is discussed that examines security policies, models, and mechanisms for confidentiality, integrity, and availability. Theory/lab
CIS 275: Web Application Programming IWeb3Dawn Dittman
An introduction to the languages used to develop and operate e-commerce sites with focus on client-side technologies. Topics include but are not limited to programming practices, HTML, extensible markup language (XML), JavaScript. Prequisite: Completion of any two of the following courses: CIS 130, CIS 251, CSC 150, CSC 250.
CIS 325: Management Information SystemsWeb3Kevin Streff
Introduction to the application of information technology in organizations, roles of managers and staff professionals in developing and using information systems with current and future technology.
CIS 328: Operating EnvironmentsWeb3Brent Tulloss
This course examines the role of the operating system in computer operations. Current operating environments including Windows NT, Unix, and similar operating environments are studied from a theoretical and hands-on perspective. Prerequisite: CIS 350.
CIS 330: COBOL IWeb3TBA
Introduction to structured COBOL programming: input, output, and reformatting; arithmetic program design; report writing; intrinsic functions; conditional branching; condition-names; iteration; control breaks; program maintenance; validity checking; and interactive programming. Prerequisites: CIS 251 or CSC 250 or CSC 150.
CIS 332: Structured Systems Analysis and DesignWeb3Cherie Notboom
Skills in structured systems analysis techniques used to define information systems solutions to business problems by producing detailed systems specifications. Prerequisite(s): CIS 130 or HON 130 or CSC 150 or HON 114
CIS 361: Advanced Programming for Business ApplicationsWeb3Jim McKeown
This course will emphasize advanced topics of business programming using contemporary development tools. Additional topics may include: objects, databases, multithreading, error trapping and web-based applications. Prerequisites: CIS 251
CIS 438: Advanced Project ManagementWeb3Cherie Noteboom
Advanced Project Management involves the application of knowledge, skills, tools and techniques for completing a project on time, within budget, and meeting quality requirements. The course will integrate concepts and techniques to identify, understand and propose solutions to the problems encountered in Project Management. The course emphasizes the Project Management Institutes Body of Knowledge as it provides project managers with the fundamental practices needed to achieve organizational results and excellence in the practice of project management. Advanced Project Management involves the application of knowledge, skills, tools and techniques for completing a project on time, within budget, and meeting quality requirements. The course will integrate concepts and techniques to identify, understand and propose solutions to the problems encountered in Project Management. The course emphasizes the Project Management Institutes Body of Knowledge as it provides project managers with the fundamental practices needed to achieve organizational results and excellence in the practice of project management.
CIS 447: Artificial Intelligence0Steve Graham
Concepts in Artificial Intelligence: programming in language such as Prolog or LISP; knowledge respresentation; search algorithms. Prerequisite: CSC 250
CIS 460: Windows AdministrationWeb3Mike Ham
This course gives students a solid foundation in the operation of Microsoft Windows-based networks. Representative topics include implementing Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol (DHCP); implementing and managing the DNS Service; remote access; routing; security templates; and troubleshooting network connectivity. The course has a significant hands-on component and is designed to provide you with practical skills that you will need as a Microsoft networking professional. Prerequisite(s): CIS 385
CSC 105: Introduction to ComputersWeb3Chris Olson
Overview of computer applications with the emphasis on word processing, spreadsheets, database, presentation tools and Internet-based applications.
CSC 105: Introduction to ComputersWeb3Keith Bundy
Overview of computer applications with the emphasis on word processing, spreadsheets, database, presentation tools and Internet-based applications.
CSC 150: Computer Science IWeb3Michael Johnson
An introduction to computer programming. Focus on problem solving, algorithm development, design, and programming concepts. Topics include sequence, selection, repetition, functions, and arrays.
CSC 206: Adv Comp Apps: Advanced Word (Aug 25-Sept 29)Web1Pam Rowland
The use of specific computer applications such as operating systems, word processing, spreadsheets, databases, graphics, integrated packages, communications packages and hardware topics. Prerequisite: CSC 105.
CSC 207: Adv Comp Apps: Spreadsheet (September 30-November 4)Web1Pam Rowland
This course covers use of advanced features in a common spreadsheet application. Prerequisite: CSC 105
CSC 208: Adv Comp Apps: Database (November 5-December 17)Web1Pam Rowland
This course covers use of advanced features in a common database application. Prerequisite: CSC 105
CSC 209: Adv Comp Apps: SAS (August 25-October 17)Web1Cecelia Wittmayer
This course covers use of advanced features in a common statistics application. Prerequisite: CSC 105
CSC 250: Computer Science IIWeb3TBA
Problem solving, algorithm design, standards of program style, debugging and testing. Extension of the control structures and data structures of the high-level language introduced in CSC 150 . Elementary data structures and basic algorithms that include sorting and searching. Topics include more advanced treatment of functions, data types such as arrays and structures, and files. Prerequisite(s): CSC 150
CSC 260: Object Oriented DesignWeb3Stephen Krebsbach
This course emphasizes object-oriented programming methodologies. An object-oriented language will be used to illustrate these OO concepts. The Unified Modeling Language (UML) will be introduced. Prerequisite: CSC 250
CSC 300: Data StructuresWeb3Tom Halverson
A systematic study of data structures and the accompanying algorithms used in computing problems; structure and use of storage; methods of representing data; techniques for implementing data structures; linear lists; stacks; queues; trees and tree traversal; linked lists; and other structures. Prerequisite: CSC 260
CSC 314: Assembly LanguageWeb3Matt Miller
A thorough introduction to assembly language programming and processor architecture. A study of low-level programming techniques, and the layout of a typical computer. The student will gain insight into the memory layout, registers, run-time stack, and global data segment of a running program. Prerequisite: CSC 250.
CSC 434: Web Software SecurityWeb3Josh Pauli
This course provides in-depth knowledge of current vendor-independent web application hacking techniques and the defensive programming approaches necessary to mitigate such attacks. Attacks and mitigation strategies related to filter evasion, session management, database interaction, path traversal, and file inclusion will be emphasized.
CSC 436: Offensive Network SecurityWeb3Pat Engebretson
This course provides theoretical and practical aspects of Network Penetration Testing. The course includes in-depth details and hands on labs for each of the five distinct phases of an ethical hack including reconnaissance, scanning and vulnerability assessment, gaining access and exploitation, maintaining access, and covering tracks. An applied approach with a focus on current tools and methodologies will be stressed. Prerequisite: CIS 385
CSC 444: System Software SecurityWeb3Matt Miller
his course provides fundamental knowledge of secure software development methodologies and applied security topics related to compiled programs. In-depth coverage of source code auditing, fuzzing, introduction to reverse engineering, and exploitation will be emphasized. Prerequisite(s): CSC 432
CSC 461: Programming LanguagesWeb3Stephen Krebsbach
This course consists of two parts. The first part introduces how programming languages are designed, including an introduction to the concepts of parsing and compiling. Issues related to implementation such as type checking, binding, and memory management are discussed. Secondly, the course will survey the spectrum of programming languages, paradigms, including traditional imperative, object oriented, functional, and logic languages. Prerequisite: CSC 300.
CSC 470: Software EngineeringWeb3Josh Pauli
An introduction to the software engineering process, including lifecycles phases, problem analysis, specification, project estimation and resource estimation, design, implementation, testing/maintenance, and project management. In particular, software validation and verificiation as well as scheduling and schedule assessment techniques will be discussed. Prerequisite: CSC 300
CSC 482: Algorithms and OptimizationWeb3Steve Graham
This course will study computer algorithms, their performance, and techniques for optimizing algorithm implementations. A variety of algorithms including search, sorting, and graph algorithms will be examined. Tools and methods for analyzing and measuring both theoretical and practical performance will be studied. Techniques for improving the performance of implementations of the algorithms will be examined. Prerequisities: CSC 300 and MATH 316
EDER 415: Educational AssessmentsWeb2Mark Hawkes
A study of educational measurements covering both the elementary and secondary fields. Technology's role in educational measurements/assessment are also covered, along with new trends in the application of technology in student assessment.
EDFN 338: Foundations of American EdWeb2Tim Fiegen
A survey of the goals, history, organization, and philosophy of American education, with emphasis on teaching as a profession; contemporary issues and practices, legal and ethical responsibilities, and attributes of effective teachers. Includes a Level I field experience.
EDFN 440: Classroom Management2Carla Miller
This course is designed to explore the principles and practices of effective classroom management. It also examines methods of establishing a safe, orderly, and equitable learning environment that fosters positive social interaction, active engagement in learning, and self-motivation.
EDFN 475: Human RelationsWeb3Gabe Mydland
This course is designed to reflect the six strands of the human relations component as mandated by the South Dakota Board of Education. Students will develop expertise in listening and communicating to create a climate within the school environment that is more conducive to learning. The course is also designed to help the participants understand the community issues in education and to encourage the teachers to be more aware of ways to strengthen community involvement in the school. Another area that will be addressed is the dehumanizing impact of biases and negative stereotyping. Prerequisite(s): Admitted to Teacher Education
ELED 303: Earth and Physical Science for Elementary TeachersWeb4Steven Steele
A non-methods course the presents major concepts and theories in astronomy, geology, meterology, chemistry, and physics. Scientific concepts and theories for elementary teachers working with K-8 students. Corequisite: ELED 303L
ELED 303L: Earth and Physical Science for Elementary Teachers LabWeb0Steven Steele
Laboratory section for ELED 303. Corequisite ELED 303
ELED 320: K-8 Science Methods3Jennifer Nash
Students develop an understanding of the tools of inquiry of K-8 science; the ability to design, deliver, and evaluate a variety of instructional strategies and processes that incorporate learning resources, materials, technologies, and state and national curriculum standards appropriate to K-8 science; the ability to assess student learning in K-8 science; and to apply these knowledge, skills, and attitudes to real life situations and experiences.
ELED 330: K-8 Math Methods3Kevin Smith
Students develop an understanding of the tools of inquiry of K-8 math; the ability to design, deliver, and evaluate a variety of instructional strategies and processes that incorporate learning resources, materials, technologies, and state and national curriculum standards appropriate to K-8 math; the ability to assess student learning in K-8 math; and to apply these knowledge, skills, and attitudes to real life situations and experiences. Must be admitted to the Teacher Education program and granted petition permission from the instructor
ELED 360: K-8 Social Science Methods2Kevin Krahenbuhl
Students develop an understanding of the tools of inquiry of K-8 social studies; the ability to design, deliver, and evaluate a variety of instructional strategies and processes that incorporate learning resources, materials, technologies, and state and national curriculum standards appropriate to K-8 social studies; the ability to assess student learning in K-8 social studies; and to apply these knowledge, skills, and attitudes to real life situations and experiences.Must be admitted to the Teacher Education program and granted petition permission from the instructor
ELED 462: Teaching English: New Language0Janel Guse
This course is designed to introduce and prepare students to teach new English language learners in diverse classrooms. This course focuses on curriculum, instruction, and assessment methods for teaching English as a new language to multicultural students in rural and urban settings.
ENGL 101: Composition IWeb3TBA
Practice in the skills, research, and documentation needed for effective academic writing. Analysis of a variety of academic and non-academic texts, rhetorical structures, critical thinking, and audience will be included. A library research component will be included. Some coursework incorporates multimedia assignments. Prerequisite: Appropriate placement based on entry-level assessment of successful completion of appropriate placement.
ENGL 201: Composition IIWeb3TBA
Study of and practice in writing persuasive prose, with the aim to improve writing skills in all disciplines. A library research component will be included. Prerequisite: ENGL 101 or consent of instructor and a minimum of 28 credit hours completed.
ENGL 208: Documentation and PresentationWeb3Maureen Murphy
Principles of clear description and documentation of computer programs and systems, and methods of preparing oral presentations. Prerequisite: ENGL 101, CSC 105.
ENGL 309: Computer-Supported Collaborative WritingWeb3Shreelina Ghosh
Principles and practices of successful team writing using a variety of computer applications. Some coursework incorporates multimedia assignments. Prerequisite: CSC 105 and a grade of "C" or better in ENGL 101
ENGL 457: Visual RhetoricWeb3Shreelina Ghosh
Study and practice in applying a rhetorical approach to the visual design of professional and technical documents. Prerequisite: ENGL 101
EPSY 210: Lifespand DevelopmentWeb3Gabe Mydland
Study of the changes that take place during an individual's life, from conception until death. Emphases placed on theory, psychosocial, biosocial, and cognitive development.
GEOG 312: Geog Elem TchrWeb3Kevin Krahenbuhl
A survey of the elements of physical and cultural geography useful to elementary teachers.
GS 491: IS: Capstone Experience3Viki Johnson
Students complete individualized plans of study which include significant one-on-one student-teacher involvement. The faculty member and students negotiate the details of the study plans. Enrollments are usually 10 or fewer students. Meetings depend upon the requirements of the topic.
HIM 130: Basic Medical TerminologyWeb2Sheila Hargens
Introduction to medical terms. Particular emphasis on word construction.
HIM 150: Intro to Health Information ManagementWeb3Patti Brooks
Introduction to health record practice, state and national medical record associations, numbering and filing systems, health record content, origin of clinical information, record retention policies and procedures, qualitative and quantitative analysis of health records. Concepts integrated into computer and laboratory experiences. Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in CSC 105.
HIM 240: Fund Disease/Diagnos Coding IIWeb4Linda Parks
A continuation of the concepts of etiology, diagnostic evaluation and treatment of disease and the application of ICD classification system, coding guidelines and resources. Concepts integrated into laboratory case studies and encoder experience.
HIM 252: Basic Foundations of Health Data SystemsWeb3Renae Spohn
Definitions and formulas for computations of basic health care statistics. Prerequisite: HIM 150
HIM 360: Management of Health Information Centers IWeb3Linda Parks
Application of the management principles of planning and organizing to health information settings. Concepts integrated into laboratory and computer experience. Prerequisite: HIM 265 and BADM 360.
HIM 443: Current Trends in Health Care DeliveryWeb3Ranae Spohn
Current trends in health care delivery; recent research, theory, issues and developments in health records, changing roles of health care providers. Prerequisite: HIM 150 and HIM 250.
HIM 444: Advanced Health Data SystemsWeb3Patti Brooks
Fundamental concepts of health information management practice in the age of electronic health records. Exploration of new skills required of HIM profession as the industry moves toward electronic health records, with an in-depth study of requirements for data collection and presentation of health data. Prerequisites: HIM 252, CSC 105, CSC 208 and CIS 325.
HLTH 201: ATOD Prevention EducationWeb2Scott Klungseth
Concepts and analysis of vital issue related to drug use, misuse and abuse. Educational principles related to teaching about drug education and ocunseling considerations in these problem areas are addresed.
HLTH 420: K-12 Methods of Health InstrWeb1Amy Veenhof
Curriculum content at elementary and secondary levels. Methods of presentation including direct, correlated, and integrated health instruction. Organization of health and safety education.
HLTH 422: NutritionWeb3Scott Staiger
This course investigates the science of food relative to human performance, nutrition, and health education. Areas of emphasis include nutrient chemistry, function, and interactions; energy consumption and metabolism; and resources for nutrition education.
INED 211: SD American Indian Culture/EdWeb3Kevin Krahenbuhl
This course is an education-focused study of the history, culture, values, family structures, traditional religions, legends, and governmental policies of South Dakota American Indian groups. Students are expected to apply the selected concepts and theories to contemporary issues in the state and region. Areas addressed include the educational application of American Indian cultural dynamics, history, teaching, and learning.
LART 110: Language ArtsWeb3Stacey Berry
Building reading speed and developing better comprehension, vocabulary, and general study skills. Each time the course is offered, there will be a specific indication of its focus (such as "reading" or "Study Skills").
MATH 095: Pre-College Algebra3Kailee Gray
This course prepares students for college level mathematics. Topics include basic properties of real numbers, exponents & radicals, rectangular coordinate geometry, solutions to linear and quadratic equations, systems of equations, inequalities, polynomials, factoring, rational expressions and equations, radical expressions and equations, and an introduction to functions such as polynomial, exponential and logarithmic functions. Note: This is remedial level course. No credit for MATH 095 will be granted for graduation.
MATH 102: College AlgebraWeb3Kim Jones
Equations and inequalities; polynomial functions and graphs; exponents, radicals, binomial theorem, zeros of polynomials; systems of equations; exponential, logarithmic, and inverse functions, applications and graphs. Other topics selected from sequences, series, and complex numbers. Prerequisite: MATH 101 (with a grade of "C" or better) or appropriate math placement.
MATH 102: College AlgebraWeb3TBA
Equations and inequalities; polynomial functions and graphs; exponents, radicals, binomial theorem, zeros of polynomials; systems of equations; exponential, logarithmic, and inverse functions, applications and graphs. Other topics selected from sequences, series, and complex numbers. Prerequisite: MATH 101 (with a grade of "C" or better) or appropriate math placement.
MATH 120: TrigonometryWeb3Glenn Berman
Topics include: trigonometric functions, equations, and identities; inverse trigonometric functions; exponential and logarithmic functions, and applications of these functions. Prerequisite: MATH 102 or appropriate math placement or consent of instructor.
MATH 121: Survey of CalculusWeb4Rich Avery
A survey of calculus including an intuitive approach to limits, continuity, differentiation, and integration with an emphasis on applications of the derivative and the integral as well as topics from multivariable calculus. Prerequisite(s): MATH 102 or determined by Board of Regent placement policy
MATH 123: Calculus IWeb4Kelly Steinmetz
The study of limits, continuity, derivatives, applications of the derivative, antiderivatives, the definite and indefinite integral, and the fundamental theorem of calculus. Prerequisite(s): MATH 102 or MATH 115 or MATH 120 or determined by Board of Regent placement policy.
MATH 316: Discrete MathematicsWeb3Glenn Berman
Selected topics from Boolean algebra, set theory, logic, functions and relations, difference equations, recurrence relations, application of algorithms, finite graphs, trees, paths and modeling. Prerequisites: MATH 125 or consent of instructor
MATH 341: Mathematical Concepts for Teachers IWeb3Rich Avery
An introduction to sets, numeration systems, arithmetic operations/algorithms, problem solving, and other topics. This course does not satisfy the mathematics general education requirement nor any mathematics area requirements other than those for a degree in elementary education. Prerequisite: MATH 102
MATH 342: Mathematical Concepts for Teachers IIWeb3Rich Avery
An introduction to geometry concepts, measurement, problem solving, probability, statistics, and other topics. This course does not satisfy the mathematics general education requirement nor any mathematics area requirements other than those for a degree in elementary education. Prerequisite: MATH 102 or MATH 341
MCOM 161: Fundamentals of Desktop PublishingWeb3Deana Hueners-Nelson
Fundamental design principles, techniques, and technology of electronic layout and prduction. Prerequisites: CSC 105
MCOM 389: Portfolio and Professional DevelopmentWeb1Shreelina Ghosh
Planning, creation, and production of portfolios and other professional materials.
MCOM 491: IS: Technical PublishingWeb3Shreelina Ghosh
Includes directed study, problems, readings, directed readings, special problems and special projects. Students complete individualized plans of study which include significant one-on-one student-teacher involvement. The faculty member and students negotiate the details of the study plans. Enrollments are usually 10 or fewer students. Meetings depending upon the requirements of the topic.
MCOM 491: S: Prin of Univ TestingWeb3Shreelina Ghosh
Includes directed study, problems, readings, directed readings, special problems and special projects. Students complete individualized plans of study which include significant one-on-one student-teacher involvement. The faculty member and students negotiate the details of the study plans. Enrollments are usually 10 or fewer students. Meetings depending upon the requirements of the topic.
POLS 100: American GovernmentWeb3Kenneth Hayes
A study of the basic principles of the American system of government with emphasis on problems relating to governmental structure and policies.
RESP 440: Ethics for Health ProfessionalsWeb3Bruce Feistner
A study of ethical topics commonly encountered in the hospital and other health care settings. Topics will include interaction with ill persons and family members, ethical and moral considerations of case scenarios, patient care based on age, communication skills, death and dying, stress, ethical principles, medical legalities, and resource allocation. Prerequisite: PSYC 101; prior clinical education and/or experience in the medical profession.
RESP 460: Current Issues in Respiratory CareWeb3Bruce Feistner
Students engage in an in-depth project on current issues, apply principles from clinical areas, critique literature, and write and present a formal paper. Prerequisite: RESP 310 and RESP 350
RESP 495: PracticumWeb3Bruce Feistner
Applied, monitored and supervised, field-based learning experience for which the student may or may not be paid. Students gain practical experience; they follow a negotiated and or directed plan of study. A higher level of supervision is provided by the instructor in these courses than is the case with field experience courses.
SEED 401: Methods Educational TechnologyWeb1TBA
Methods of teaching educational technology including the integration of technology to support teaching and learning in K-12 classrooms.
SOC 100: Introduction to SociologyWeb3Viki Johnson
Comprehensive study of society, with analysis of group life, and other forces shaping human behavior.
SOC 240: The Sociology of Rural AmericaWeb3TBA
Focus is on rural society, rural communities, population composition and trends, social processes, social participation in rural organizations and agencies; American agriculture in a global context; and changing relationship between country and city in comtemporary society.
SOC 285: Society & TechnologyWeb3TBA
Exploring a variety of domestic and global topics relating to technology, society and culture. Prerequisite: CSC 105
SPCM 101: Fundamentals of SpeechWeb3Susan Conover
Introduces the study of speech fundamentals and critical thinking through frequent public speaking practice, including setting, purpose, audience, and subject.
SPCM 101: Fundamentals of SpeechWeb3Kelly MacLeod
Introduces the study of speech fundamentals and critical thinking through frequent public speaking practice, including setting, purpose, audience, and subject.
SPED 100: Introduction to Persons with ExceptionalitiesWeb3Sandi Steinhoff-Muller
A survey of the various exceptionalities and implications of education; the history and philosophy of special education; and state and federal legislation affecting special education. Includes a Level I field experience.
SPED 410: Behavior Mgmt of Except ChildWeb3Carla Miller
This course covers the development and implementation of positive behavior management including interventions, strategies, and supports as appropriate for individual students with disabilities. Requires Granted Peition for enrollment. For Online Elementary/Speical Education majors only.
SPED 413: Serve Studt W/Severe DisabltyWeb3Sandi Steinhoff-Muller
This course is the study of instructional strategies, materials, and equipment specific to the instruction of students with cognitive disabilities, developmental disabilities, and severe disabilities.
SPED 441: Methods for Diverse LearnersWeb2Sandi Steinhoff-Muller
This course addresses roles and responsibilities of special and general educators as they instruct individuals from diverse cultural and linguistic backgrounds. The major focus of the course is to identify research-based practices, such as collaboration, differentiation, and Response to Intervention (RTI) practices, which are designed to promote achievement of diverse students in contemporary classrooms.
SPED 454: Guided ReadingWeb2TBA
Emphasis is on combining theory to practice in the areas of guided reading, writing, phonemic/ vocabulary and selected reading and research to support teaching strategies and assessment. This course includes a Level III Field Experience in a guided reading classroom. Requires admission to Teacher Education program and granted petition permission from the instructor.
SPED 460: Family Systems/Professional CollaborationWeb2Tim Fiegen
This covers the collaboration and communication skills necessary to work within family systems and the use of resources and services supporting birth through lifespan services, multidisciplinary team functioning, and the placement committee processes. Admission to Teacher Education.
SPED 465: Computer Applications in Special EducationWeb3Tim Fiegen
ISTE Foundation Standards will be studied for the implementation and management of computers in the special education setting. A functional curriculum framework for designing computer learning activities and experiences appropriate for children and adolescents with learning problems will be developed. Other points of emphasis will be comuter adaptive equipment, multicultural concerns, and developing critical thinking skills with the use of the computer. Includes a Level II field experience. Prerequisites: SPED 100, CSC 105, and Admission to Teacher Education.
WEL 100: Wellness for LifeWeb1Ken Prorok
This course introduces the importance and holistic nature of the six dimensions of personal wellness and fitness. The course will provide the necessary knowledge and skills to make informed decisions which will lead to the development of a healthy lifestyle. Various issues related to the dimensions of wellness will be discussed. Students will have the opportunity to assess their current health status and identify potential risk factors.
WEL 100: Wellness for LifeWeb1Erin Nielsen
This course introduces the importance and holistic nature of the six dimensions of personal wellness and fitness. The course will provide the necessary knowledge and skills to make informed decisions which will lead to the development of a healthy lifestyle. Various issues related to the dimensions of wellness will be discussed. Students will have the opportunity to assess their current health status and identify potential risk factors.
WEL 100L: Wellness LabWeb1Ken Prorok
This laboratory experience applies wellness concepts taught in WEL 100 lecture. Students will gain a level of understanding about one's personal fitness level as well as learn a variety of skills to enhance personal wellness.
WEL 100L: Wellness LabWeb1Erin Nielsen
This laboratory experience applies wellness concepts taught in WEL 100 lecture. Students will gain a level of understanding about ones personal fitness level as well as learn a variety of skills to enhance personal wellness.