Spring 2014 Online Undergraduate Courses

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Spring 2014 Drop/Add and Withdraw Dates

Tuition and Fees are due by the first day of class. 

Payment or a payment plan is required to avoid cancellation of registration and late fee assessment.

 

Spring 2014

Last day to drop for 100% refund or add a course(s)

Last day to drop a class or withdraw from all courses in a session (70% completion) and receive a grade of W NO REFUND

January 13 - May 9

January 22

April 7

Please check Academic Calendar for Spring 2014 nonstandard date courses for drop/add and withdraw dates.

 

Spring 2014 Undergraduate Courses       View Graduate Courses
course titlemodehrsinstructor
ACCT 211: Principles of Accounting IIWeb3Margaret O'Brien
A continuation of ACCT 210 with emphasis on partnership and corporate structures, management decision-making, cost control, and other selected topics. . Prerequisite: ACCT 210
ACCT 431: Advanced Income TaxWeb3Rick Puetz
A study of Federal Income Tax law as it applies to partnership, S corporations, C corporations, as well as other selected topics.
ARTH 212: History of World Art IIWeb3TBA
Art and architecture in the historical and contextual development the role of visual art; including crafts, drawing, painting, sculpture, and architecture; in the historical and cultural development of world civilization from the renaissance through the 20th century.
BADM 101: Survey of BusinessWeb3Jack Walters
This course is an introduction to the basic business disciplines and the organization and management of the American enterprise system. It also introduces students to the necessary college level skills of critical thinking, effective communication and cooperative and effective learning.
BADM 291: Survey of BusinessWeb3Jack Walters
BADM 310: Business FinanceWeb3Randall Harkless
Business finance is an overview of financial theory including the time value of money, capital budgeting, capital structure theory, divident policies, asset pricing, risk and return, the efficient markets hypothesis, bond and stock valuation, business performance evaluation and other financial topics. Prerequisite: ACCT 211
BADM 331: Financial TechnologyWeb3Yenling Chang
This course studies the retrieval and analysis of publicly available financial data, develops advanced expertise in the use of spreadsheet financial functions, and uses Excel, Minitab, and other statistical and financial dedicated software for financial analysis, forecasting, and model building.
BADM 344: Managerial CommunicationsWeb3 Lynette Molstad-Gorder
This advanced writing course is designed to assist students with the development and refinement of their communication skills. It stresses the factors underlying the composition of managerial communications, including organizational structure, reader analysis, and content quality for letters and memoranda, informational and analytical reports, and grant proposals. Prerequisite: CSC 105
BADM 350: Legal Environment of BusinessWeb3Brian Ahrendt
This is a study of legal topics as they apply to the business environment. Topics include an introduction to the law, the U.S. Court system, legal process, government regulation, and criminal, tort, and contract issues.
BADM 370: MarketingWeb3Cecelia Wittmayer
This course introduces the student to the basic concepts and practices of modern marketing. Topics include marketing and its linkages to business, consumer behavior, marketing research, strategy and planning, product and pricing decisions, distribution and promotion decisions, marketing management, and evaluation and control aspects for both consumer and industrial goods.
BADM 411: Investements30Yenling Change
This course is a thorough study of the equity market including fundamental valuation techniques, asset allocation, the efficient markets hypothesis and its implications, portfolio theory, risk and return, the primary and secondary market mechanisms, security market indicators, and international investing. An overview of the bond market including bond valuation, duration, and bond portfolio management, and an introduction to options, futures, and forward contracts are provided. The vital roles of computer technology and electronic trading are also explored.
BADM 425: Production/Operations ManagementWeb3David Peak
This course studies the basic tools of operations management with emphasis on decision-making models in production and planning. Such topics as decision theory, production planning and control, inventory control, materials requirement planning, project management, and quality control are covered. Prerequisite(s): BADM 220 or MATH 281
BADM 457: Business EthicsWeb3Jeffrey Tschetter
This course is a study of the ethical implications of managerial decisions. Topics covered include the responsibility of the organization to the individual and society, the role of the individual within the organization, and ethical systems for American business. The course provides an examination and assessment of current American business practices.
BADM 460: Human Resource ManagementWeb3Jack Walters
This course provides a survey of managerial practices with respect ot the management of the human resource function and an introduction to the topic of human resource, management as an occupational choice. Major areas of inquiry include recruitment and selection, training and development, compensation and benefits administration and work force integration and maintenance. Prerequisite: BADM 360
BADM 464: Organizational BehaviorWeb3Zixing Shen
This course involves a study of individual and groups. Traditional organizational theory and concepts are presented and study is given to motivation, group dynamics, and methods of coordination, change, and adaptation within an organization. Prerequisite: BADM 360
BIOL 103: Biology Survey IIWeb3Nevine Nawar
Study of energetics, plant growth, development, and reproduction; animal structure and function. Intended for those not majoring in biology. Prerequisite: BIOL 101 or BIOL 151. BIOL 103 Lab is required.
BIOL 103L: Biology Survey IIWeb0Nevine Nawar
Laboratory experience that accompanies BIOL 103.
BIOL 323: Human Anatomy and PhysiologyWeb4Nevine Nawar
Study of the structure and function of the human body including interrelationships among body systems. Includes significant weekly laboratory exercises. Prerequisite: BIOL 101 or BIOL 151. BIOL 323 Lab is required.
BIOL 323L: Human Anatomy and PhysiologyWeb0Nevine Nawar
Laboratory experience that accompanies BIOL 323.
CIS 130: Visual Basic ProgrammingWeb3Jim McKeown
Fundamentals of programming using Visual Basic. Focus on problem solving, visual design and programming concepts. Topics include sequence, selection, repetition, procedures and functions.
CIS 251: Business Applications ProgrammingWeb3Jim McKeown
Emphasis on logical design and structured programming techniques. Writing, debugging and testing business programs. Prerequisite: CIS 130.
CIS 277: OS Interfaces and UtilitiesWeb3TBA
Concepts and techniques of interfacing programs with an operation system using Job Control Language. Use of storage devices using vendor supplied utilities. Prerequisite: CIS 330 (concurrent enrollment CIS 331)
CIS 277: OS Interfaces and UtilitiesWeb3Tara Johnson
Concepts and techniques of interfacing programs with an operation system using Job Control Language. Use of storage devices using vendor supplied utilities. Prerequisite: CIS 330 (concurrent enrollment CIS 331)
CIS 325: Management Information SystemsWeb3Kevin Streff
Introduction to the application of information technology in organizations, roles of managers and staff professionals in developing and using information systems with current and future technology.
CIS 331: COBOL IIWeb3TBA
Advanced structured COBOL programming with arrays; table look-ups; subporgrams; sequential file processing; sorting and merging; indexed file processing; text manmanipulations; debugging; and on-line applications. Prerequisite: CIS 330.
CIS 338: Project ManagementWeb3Cherie Noteboom
A study of the priniciples and techniques used in management project. Project management software will be used. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing
CIS 361: Advanced Programming for Business ApplicationsWeb3Jim McKeown
This course will emphasize advanced topics of business programming using contemporary development tools. Additional topics may include: objects, databases, multithreading, error trapping and web-based applications. Prerequisites: CIS 251
CIS 375: Web Application Programming IIWeb3Seth Larson
An introduction to the languages used to develop and operate e-commerce sites with focus on server-side technologies. Topics include issues common to the development of e-commerce sites such as mixed technology environments, security, and internationalization. Prerequisite: CIS 275
CIS 375: Web Application Programming IIWeb3Mike Johnson
An introduction to the languages used to develop and operate e-commerce sites with focus on server-side technologies. Topics include issues common to the development of e-commerce sites such as mixed technology environments, security, and internationalization. Prerequisite: CIS 275
CIS 383: Networking IWeb3Seth Larson
LAN topoligies, media choices, protoocols and transmission techniques are addressed. Overview of LAN planning and installation considerations. LAN hardware and software offerings and problem determination procedures are presented. Prerequisite: CIS 350
CIS 383: Networking IWeb3Brent Tulloss
LAN topoligies, media choices, protoocols and transmission techniques are addressed. Overview of LAN planning and installation considerations. LAN hardware and software offerings and problem determination procedures are presented. Prerequisite: CIS 350
CIS 384: Decision Support SystemsWeb3Zixing Shen
A study of the decision process, including the garthering, analysis and application of data. Decision Support Systems (DSS) represents a point of view on the role of the computer in the decision-making process. Decision support implies the use of computers to: assist managers in their decision making, support rather than replace managerial judgment, and improve the effectiveness of decision making rather than just its efficiency. The course covers the tools, techniques, and theory of DSS and how they can be used to improve the quality of management decisions. Prerequisite: Junior Standing.
CIS 388: Computer Forensics FundatmentalsWeb3Ashley Podhradsky
Identifying, preserving, extracting, and examining data from computers. Prerequisite: CIS 350 or 363
CIS 418: Advanced Computer ForensicsWeb3Ashley Podhradsky
This course will analyze the impact that portable devices have in a digital forensic investigation. Current portable devices, such as mobile phones and tablets will be forensically analyzed.
CIS 424: Internet and Electronic CommerceWeb3TBA
Understanding the concepts and applications of electronic commerce through the Internet. The course will focus on electronic data interchange, Internet web pages for electronic commerce, scripting for client/server electronic commerce, security issues and database considerations. Prerequisites: CIS 332, completion of 6 credits in CSC or CIS, (except CSC 105).
CIS 424: Internet and Electronic CommerceWeb3Wayne Pauli
Understanding the concepts and applications of electronic commerce through the Internet. The course will focus on electronic data interchange, Internet web pages for electronic commerce, scripting for client/server electronic commerce, security issues and database considerations. Prerequisites: CIS 332, completion of 6 credits in CSC or CIS, (except CSC 105).
CIS 427: Information Systems Planning and ManagementWeb3Cherie Noteboom
A study of financial, technical and strategic information systems planning processes. Emphasis will be placed on the relationship of information systems to the overall business planning. Prerequisite: CIS 332 or CIS 325
CIS 466: Survey of Network ApplicationsWeb3Kyle Cronin
This course addresses the basics of implementing and managing mission-critical applications that are found in most organizations. This course has a significant hands-on component that utilizes popular network operating systems. Representative topics include Web servers; electronic mail systems; backup and recovery software; network monitoring and management tools; and remote access. Prerequisite(s): CIS 460 and CIS 462
CIS 468: Scripting for Network AdministrationWeb3Chris Olson
This course uses current development platforms to teach the basic techniques for programming client/server applications that operate over modern computer networks. Topics include named pipes, mailslots, sockets, file handling, remote procedure calls, and applets. Prerequisite(s): CIS 385
CIS 484: Database Management SystemsWeb3TBA
The study of formalized database design. This course will focus on relational model design and the use of SQL. Students will use a modern relational database to implement designs and learn the basics of data management. Prerequisite: CIS 332
CIS 484: Database Management SystemsWeb3Ronghua Shan
The study of formalized database design. This course will focus on relational model design and the use of SQL. Students will use a modern relational database to implement designs and learn the basics of data management. Prerequisite: CIS 332
CIS 487: Database ProgrammingWeb3Ronghua Shan
Provides hands-on experience with procedural extensions to SQL. Topics include data control languages, control structures, exception handling, stored procedures, triggers, cursors and cursor processing. Prerequisite: CIS 484.
CSC 105: Introduction to ComputersWeb3Pam Rowland
Overview of computer applications with the emphasis on word processing, spreadsheets, database, presentation tools and Internet-based applications.
CSC 105: Introduction to ComputersWeb3Keith Bundy
Overview of computer applications with the emphasis on word processing, spreadsheets, database, presentation tools and Internet-based applications.
CSC 150: Computer Science IWeb3Michael Johnson
An introduction to computer programming. Focus on problem solving, algorithm development, design, and programming concepts. Topics include sequence, selection, repetition, functions, and arrays.
CSC 206: Advanced Computer Apps: Expression WebWeb1TBA
The use of specific computer applications such as operating systems, word processing, spreadsheets, databases, graphics, integrated packages, communications packages and hardware topics. Prerequisite: CSC 105.
CSC 206: Advanced Computer Apps: Advanced Word (January 13 - February 19)Web1Pam Rowland
The use of specific computer applications such as operating systems, word processing, spreadsheets, databases, graphics, integrated packages, communications packages and hardware topics. Prerequisite: CSC 105.
CSC 207: Adv Comp Apps: Spreadsheet (February 20 - April 02)Web1Pam Rowland
This course covers use of advanced features in a common spreadsheet application. Prerequisite: CSC 105
CSC 208: Adv Comp Apps: Database (April 3 - May 9)Web1Pam Rowland
This course covers use of advanced features in a common database application. Prerequisite: CSC 105
CSC 250: Computer Science IIWeb3Matt Miller
Problem solving, algorithm design, standards of program style, debugging and testing. Extension of the control structures and data structures of the high-level language introduced in CSC 150 . Elementary data structures and basic algorithms that include sorting and searching. Topics include more advanced treatment of functions, data types such as arrays and structures, and files. Prerequisite(s): CSC 150
CSC 300: Data StructuresWeb3Stephen Krebsbach
A systematic study of data structures and the accompanying algorithms used in computing problems; structure and use of storage; methods of representing data; techniques for implementing data structures; linear lists; stacks; queues; trees and tree traversal; linked lists; and other structures. Prerequisite: CSC 260
CSC 403: Programming Graphical User InterfaceWeb3Steve Grahem
A course dealing with the issues of programming in a graphical user interface environment. In-depth programming will be done in a graphical operating system environment. Issues such as design of user interfaces, object-oriented programming and networking will be covered along with examples of other environments. Prerequisite(s): CSC 250
CSC 418: ForensicsWeb3Ashley Podhradsky
CSC 432: Operating System SecurityWeb3Pat Engebretson
This course provides fundamental knowledge of current computer security essentials. Topics include system and device auditing, hardening, and logging, as well as an introduction to cryptography and its applications. Students will also be exposed to advanced malware concepts including rootkits, malware, detection, and the utilization of industry standard tools to analyze and reverse engineering unknown binaries.
CSC 438: Defensive Network SecurityWeb3Kyle Cronin
This course provides theoretical and practical aspects of firewalls and intrusion detection systems. Topics include configuration, implementation, rule creation, filtering, and other state-of-the-art developments. Intrusion detection topics will provide both host based and network based exposure while firewalling concepts will include the use of both application and enterprise level devices. Prerequisite: CIS 385
CSC 456: Operating SystemsWeb3Stephen Krebsbach
A study of the functions and structures associated with operating systems with respect ot process management, memory management, auxiliary storage management, and processor management. Topics include concurrent and distributed computing, deadlock, real and virtual memory, job and processor scheduling, security and protection. Prerequisites: CSC 300
CSC 466: Language ProcessingWeb3Tom Halverson
A study of computer language processing through the activities of language design, specification, and translation. Computer language processing tools (compiler construction tools) will be used to demonstrate many of the concepts. The scanning, parsing, semantic analysis and code generation phases of compilation will be studied. Theoretical concepts including grammars and automata will be introduced. Programming projects will be required. Prerequisite: CSC 300 and CSC 461.
EDFN 338: Foundations of American EdWeb2Tim Fiegen
A survey of the goals, history, organization, and philosophy of American education, with emphasis on teaching as a profession; contemporary issues and practices, legal and ethical responsibilities, and attributes of effective teachers. Includes a Level I field experience.
EDFN 365: Computer-Based Technology & LearningWeb3Mark Geary
Prepares students to integrate computers into the curriculum by exploring the evolving uses and expectations of technolgy as a teaching and learning tool. Course objectives based on ISTE standards. Admission to Teacher Education
EDFN 475: Human RelationsWeb3Gabe Mydland
This course is designed to reflect the six strands of the human relations component as mandated by the South Dakota Board of Education. Students will develop expertise in listening and communicating to create a climate within the school environment that is more conducive to learning. The course is also designed to help the participants understand the community issues in education and to encourage the teachers to be more aware of ways to strengthen community involvement in the school. Another area that will be addressed is the dehumanizing impact of biases and negative stereotyping. Prerequisite(s): Admitted to Teacher Education
ELED 303: Earth and Physical Science for Elementary TeachersWeb4Jennifer Nash
A non-methods course the presents major concepts and theories in astronomy, geology, meterology, chemistry, and physics. Scientific concepts and theories for elementary teachers working with K-8 students. Corequisite: ELED 303L
ELED 303L: Earth and Physical Science for Elementary Teachers LabWeb0Jennifer Nash
Laboratory section for ELED 303. Corequisite ELED 303
ELED 320: K-8 Science Methods3Jennifer Nash
Students develop an understanding of the tools of inquiry of K-8 science; the ability to design, deliver, and evaluate a variety of instructional strategies and processes that incorporate learning resources, materials, technologies, and state and national curriculum standards appropriate to K-8 science; the ability to assess student learning in K-8 science; and to apply these knowledge, skills, and attitudes to real life situations and experiences.
ELED 330: K-8 Math Methods3Kevin Smith
Students develop an understanding of the tools of inquiry of K-8 math; the ability to design, deliver, and evaluate a variety of instructional strategies and processes that incorporate learning resources, materials, technologies, and state and national curriculum standards appropriate to K-8 math; the ability to assess student learning in K-8 math; and to apply these knowledge, skills, and attitudes to real life situations and experiences.
ELED 360: K-8 Social Science Methods2Kevin Krahenbuhl
Students develop an understanding of the tools of inquiry of K-8 social studies; the ability to design, deliver, and evaluate a variety of instructional strategies and processes that incorporate learning resources, materials, technologies, and state and national curriculum standards appropriate to K-8 social studies; the ability to assess student learning in K-8 social studies; and to apply these knowledge, skills, and attitudes to real life situations and experiences.
ELED 440: K-8 Language Arts MethodsWeb2Vicki Sterling
Students develop an understanding of the tools of inquiry of K-8 language arts, integrating reading, writing, speaking and listening, the ability to design, deliver, and evaluate a variety of instructional strategies and processes that incorporate learning resources, materials, technologies, and state and national curriculum standards appropriate to K-8 language arts; the ability to assess student learning in K-8 language arts; and to apply these knowledge, skills, and attitudes to real life situations and experiences.
ELED 459: Intro: Literacy Assess/RemedWeb3Vicki Sterling
This is a practical course in which the student is directed toward acquiring specific skills that will enable a teacher to complete group and individual assessments and develop activities to remediate reading problems. This course includes a practicum.
ENGL 201: Composition IIWeb3Shreelina Ghosh
Study of and practice in writing persuasive prose, with the aim to improve writing skills in all disciplines. A library research component will be included. Prerequisite: ENGL 101 or consent of instructor and a minimum of 28 credit hours completed.
ENGL 210: Introduction to LiteratureWeb3Deana Hueners-Nelson
Readings in fiction, drama and poetry to acquaint students with literature and aesthetic form. Prerequisite: ENGL 101 or consent of instructor
ENGL 268: LiteratureWeb3John Nelson
Introductory literature course focusing on one genre such as fiction, poetry, drama, etc. The genre will be identified each semester as, for example, Literature: Fiction, or Literature: Poetry, etc. May be repeated with different genre and content. Prerequisite(s): ENGL 101
ENGL 305: Professional, Technical & Grant WritingWeb3Maureen Murphy
Professional and technical writing in such areas as grant research and proposals, progress and prject reports, abstracts, technical articles and correspondence. Prerequisites: A grade of "C" or better in ENGL 101, or consent of instructor.
ENGL 343: Selected Authors: Native AmeWeb3John Nelson
A study of the work of one or several major literary figures. Authors vary each tme thecourse is offered. Prerequisite: A grade of "C" or better in ENGL 101 or consent of the instructor.
ENGL 480: Contemporary RhetoricWeb3Shreelina Ghosh
A study of rhetoric based in classical rhetorical theory applied to contemporary rhetorical discussions. The course will emphasize the impact and applications of computer technology and current rehtorical theory and pedagogy. Some coursework incorporates multimedia assignments. Prerequisite: A grade of "C" or better in ENGL 101, ENGL 201
GEOG 200: Intro to Human GeographyWeb3Karie Forbes-Boyte
Systematic study of world culture from perspective of five integrating themes: cultural region, cultural diffusion, cultural ecology, cultural integration, and cultural landscape. Topics include population, agriculture, political and economic systems, religion and language, folk and popular culture, and ethnicity.
HIM 130: Basic Medical TerminologyWeb2Sheila Hargens
Introduction to medical terms. Particular emphasis on word construction.
HIM 170: Legal Aspects of Health Information ManagementWeb3Renae Spohn
Study of the principles of law as applied to the health field, with particular reference to medical record practice. Prerequisite: HIM 150
HIM 250: Alternative Site Health Information ManagementWeb2Joyce Havlik
An introduction to the management, retrieval and retention of health records in settings other than hospitals. The course will also cover reimbursement, licensing and accreditation issues, and include investigation of applicable computer information systems. Concepts incorporated into laboratory and computer experience. Prerequisite: HIM 150
HIM 262: CPT/HCPCS Healthcare Coding SystemsWeb3Linda Parks
CPT/HCPCS coding and coding practice will be addressed using manual and automated encoding systems emphasis will be placed on coding the outpatient setting. Concepts integrated into laboratory and computer experience with assignment of codes to various clinical statements, scenarios, reports, and patient records. Prerequisite: HIM 160
HIM 264: Healthcare Reimbursement MethodologiesWeb1Linda Parks
The uses of coded data and health information in reimbursement and payment systems. Reimbursement management and optimization issues will be investigated for both hospital and non-hospital entities. Concepts integrated into laboratory and computer experience utilizing manual and automated encoding/grouping systems. Prerequisite: HIM 160, HIM 262. Concurrent enrollment in HIM 262 is permitted.
HIM 265: Management of Quality and Related Functions for HIMWeb4Renae Spohn
The study of the principles of quality management and its component functions (institutional and medical staff monitoring and evaluation activities, risk management, utilization review and credentialing) as applied to acute care settings and within the health record department specifically as well as within other healthcare settings generally. The study of medical staff roles and functions; hospital and medical staff committees and their roles and functions; an overview of the regulations of health care resources; and the application of supervisory management principles in the health information management area. Concepts incorporated into laboratory and computer experience. Prerequisite: HIM 150
HIM 292: Topics: Fund Disease Diag CodWeb1Linda Parks
Includes current topics, advanced topics and special topics. A course devoted to a particular issue in a specified field. Course content is not wholly included in the regular curriculum. Guest artists or experts may serve as instructors. enrollments are usually of 10 or fewer students with significant one-on-one student/teacher involvement.
HIM 450: Research in Health Information AdministrationWeb3Renee Spohn
An introduction to research methods in the healthcare industry that guides the student through the research process including developing problem statements, performing literature searches, evaluating and writing proposals and critiquing existing research articles. The course will also include an overview of existing statistical software applications used in research. Research and presentation of an aspect of health information management will be included.Prerequisite: Completion of HIM 443, HIM 444, HIM 361 (may be taken concurrently) and BADM 220 (may be taken concurrently).
HIM 492: HIM Class to CareersWeb1Linda Parks, Renae Spohn
Includes current topics, advanced topics and special topics. A course devoted to a particular issue in a specified field. Course content is not wholly included in the regular curriculum. Guest artists or experts may serve as instructors. Enrollments are usually of 10 or fewer students with significant one-on-one student/teacher involvement.
HLTH 201: ATOD Prevention EducationWeb2Scott Klungseth
Concepts and analysis of vital issue related to drug use, misuse and abuse. Educational principles related to teaching about drug education and ocunseling considerations in these problem areas are addresed.
INED 411: South Dakota Indian StudiesWeb3Matt Nelson
A basic knowledge of Indian history with emphasis on the Lakota, Dakota, and Nakota speaking people. Current cultural issues are presented including values, family structures, traditional religion, fine arts, legends, economics, governmental policies, treaties, acts and related areas. Focuses on teaching methods, content and materials to equip students to teach bi-culturally.
LIBM 205: Children's LiteratureWeb2Mark Geary
An introduction to children's literature with emphasis on historical types of literature; selection and evaluation of books according to levels, interests, special needs, and educational objectives.
MATH 021: Basic AlgebraWeb3Kailee Gray
This course prepares students for college level mathematics. Topics generally include: basic properties of real numbers, exponents and radicals, rectangular coordinate geometry, solutions to linear and quadratic equations, inequalities, polynomials and factoring. Students may also be introduced to functions and systems of equations. Note: This is remedial level course and no credit for MATH 021 will be granted for graduation. Prerequisite: Appropriate Mathematics Placement.
MATH 101: Intermediate AlgebraWeb3Kailee Gray
Basic properties of real numbers, linear equations and inequalities, quadratic equations, systems of equations, polynomials and factoring, rational expressions and equations, and radical expressions and equations, and an introduction to functions such as polynomial, exponential and logarithmic functions. Credit for MATH 101 will not be granted to anyone who has previously received credit for MATH 102. Prerequisite: Appropriate Mathematics Placement. Note: Students must earn a grade of "C" or better to meet the prerequisite for MATH 102.
MATH 101: Intermediate AlgebraWeb3Lindsey Brewer
Basic properties of real numbers, linear equations and inequalities, quadratic equations, systems of equations, polynomials and factoring, rational expressions and equations, and radical expressions and equations, and an introduction to functions such as polynomial, exponential and logarithmic functions. Credit for MATH 101 will not be granted to anyone who has previously received credit for MATH 102. Prerequisite: Appropriate Mathematics Placement. Note: Students must earn a grade of "C" or better to meet the prerequisite for MATH 102.
MATH 102: College AlgebraWeb3Kim Jones
Equations and inequalities; polynomial functions and graphs; exponents, radicals, binomial theorem, zeros of polynomials; systems of equations; exponential, logarithmic, and inverse functions, applications and graphs. Other topics selected from sequences, series, and complex numbers. Prerequisite: MATH 101 (with a grade of "C" or better) or appropriate math placement.
MATH 120: TrigonometryWeb3Justin Peterson
Topics include: trigonometric functions, equations, and identities; inverse trigonometric functions; exponential and logarithmic functions, and applications of these functions. Prerequisite: MATH 102 or appropriate math placement or consent of instructor.
MATH 121: Survey of CalculusWeb4Rich Avery
A survey of calculus including an intuitive approach to limits, continuity, differentiation, and integration with an emphasis on applications of the derivative and the integral as well as topics from multivariable calculus. Prerequisite(s): MATH 102 or determined by Board of Regent placement policy
MATH 123: Calculus IWeb4Kelly Steinmetz
The study of limits, continuity, derivatives, applications of the derivative, antiderivatives, the definite and indefinite integral, and the fundamental theorem of calculus. Prerequisite(s): MATH 102 or MATH 115 or MATH 120 or determined by Board of Regent placement policy.
MATH 315: Linear Algebra0Rich Avery
Course topics include: the theory and applications of systems of linear equations, matrices, determinants, vector spaces, linear transformations and applications. Prerequisite(s): MATH 225
MATH 341: Mathematical Concepts for Teachers IWeb3Rich Avery
An introduction to sets, numeration systems, arithmetic operations/algorithms, problem solving, and other topics. This course does not satisfy the mathematics general education requirement nor any mathematics area requirements other than those for a degree in elementary education. Prerequisite: MATH 102
MATH 342: Mathematical Concepts for Teachers IIWeb3Rich Avery
An introduction to geometry concepts, measurement, problem solving, probability, statistics, and other topics. This course does not satisfy the mathematics general education requirement nor any mathematics area requirements other than those for a degree in elementary education. Prerequisite: MATH 102 or MATH 341
MCOM 358: Principles of Usability TestingWeb3Shreelina Ghosh
Introduces methods of gathering user requirements, designing usability tests for web sites, documents and other products of interest. Prerequisite: 28 credits
MCOM 360: Technical PublishingWeb3Shreelina Ghosh
A study and practice in the use of computer hardware and software used for writing, editing, printing, and publishing technical media. Prerequisite(s): CSC 105 and ENGL 208 or MCOM 161
POLS 100: American GovernmentWeb3Kenneth Hayes
A study of the basic principles of the American system of government with emphasis on problems relating to governmental structure and policies.
POLS 100: American GovernmentWeb3TBA
A study of the basic principles of the American system of government with emphasis on problems relating to governmental structure and policies.
PSYC 101: General PsychologyWeb3Gabe Mydland
This course is an introductory survey of the field of psychology with consideration of the biological bases of behavior, sensory and perceptual processes, learning and memory, human growth and deveopment, social behavior and normal and abnormal behavior.
RESP 105: Respiratory Care Physical ScienceWeb3Bruce Feistner
This course will introduce the beginning respiratory care student to gas laws, mechanics of ventilation, pressures and fluid movements, statistics, microbiology, repiratory medications, CPR, and respiratory modalities.
RESP 440: Ethics for Health ProfessionalsWeb3Bruce Feistner
A study of ethical topics commonly encountered in the hospital and other health care settings. Topics will include interaction with ill persons and family members, ethical and moral considerations of case scenarios, patient care based on age, communication skills, death and dying, stress, ethical principles, medical legalities, and resource allocation. Prerequisite: PSYC 101; prior clinical education and/or experience in the medical profession.
RESP 460: Current Issues in Respiratory CareWeb3Bruce Feistner
Students engage in an in-depth project on current issues, apply principles from clinical areas, critique literature, and write and present a formal paper. Prerequisite: RESP 310 and RESP 350
SOC 150: Social ProblemsWeb3Viki Johnson
A study of present day problems in contemporary societies, such as racism, sexism, ageism, alcoholism, drug addiction, physical and mental health, war and environmental issues-their significance and current policies and action.
SOC 285: Society & TechnologyWeb3Roger Reed
Exploring a variety of domestic and global topics relating to technology, society and culture. Prerequisite: CSC 105
SOC 483: Sociology of Gender RolesWeb3Viki Johnson
Female and male roles in relation to one another in a changing world are the foci of this course. The nature of gender roles, their origin and maintenance, institutional features, and their variations over time and across curltures are examined. Prerequisites: SOC 100 or SOC 150
SPCM 101: Fundamentals of SpeechWeb3Michael Lynch
Introduces the study of speech fundamentals and critical thinking through frequent public speaking practice, including setting, purpose, audience, and subject
SPCM 410: Organizational Communication3Maureen Murphy
Explores communication processes in organizational contexts, theories of leadership, decision making and conflict, the application of principles that facilitate communication in organizations, and other selected topics.
SPED 100: Introduction to Persons with ExceptionalitiesWeb3Sandi Steinhoff-Muller
A survey of the various exceptionalities and implications of education; the history and philosophy of special education; and state and federal legislation affecting special education. Includes a Level I field experience.
SPED 410: Behavior Mgmt of Except ChildWeb3Carla Miller
This course covers the development and implementation of positive behavior management including interventions, strategies, and supports as appropriate for individual students with disabilities.
SPED 417: Voc-Transitional ProgrammingWeb2Sandi Steinhoff-Muller
This course presents knowledge and skills regarding vocational and transition planning and programming, including an overview of internal and community resources such as rehabilitation services and interagency services. Prerequisite: SPED 100
SPED 420: K-12Curriculum and Instruction StrategyWeb3Tim Fiegen
Curriculum and individual education program development for special class teachers including strategies and materials at the K-12 level.
SPED 441: Methods for Diverse LearnersWeb2Sandi Steinhoff-Muller
This course addresses roles and responsibilities of special and general educators as they instruct individuals from diverse cultural and linguistic backgrounds. The major focus of the course is to identify research-based practices, such as collaboration, differentiation, and Response to Intervention (RTI) practices, which are designed to promote achievement of diverse students in contemporary classrooms.
SPED 454: Guided ReadingWeb2Vicki C. Sterling
Emphasis is on combining theory to practice in the areas of guided reading, writing, phonemic/ vocabulary and selected reading and research to support teaching strategies and assessment. This course includes a Level III Field Experience in a guided reading classroom. Requires admission to Teacher Education program.
SPED 460: Family Systems/Professional CollaborationWeb2Tim Fiegen
This covers the collaboration and communication skills necessary to work within family systems and the use of resources and services supporting birth through lifespan services, multidisciplinary team functioning, and the placement committee processes. Admission to Teacher Education.
THEA 201: Film AppreciationWeb3Susan Conover
This course explores the art of film and its impact on society. The student explores American and International cultures through the study of their films, filmmaking, and critical analysis.
WEL 100: Wellness for LifeWeb1Ken Prorok
This course introduces the importance and holistic nature of the six dimensions of personal wellness and fitness. The course will provide the necessary knowledge and skills to make informed decisions which will lead to the development of a healthy lifestyle. Various issues related to the dimensions of wellness will be discussed. Students will have the opportunity to assess their current health status and identify potential risk factors.
WEL 100: Wellness for LifeWeb1Erin Nielsen
This course introduces the importance and holistic nature of the six dimensions of personal wellness and fitness. The course will provide the necessary knowledge and skills to make informed decisions which will lead to the development of a healthy lifestyle. Various issues related to the dimensions of wellness will be discussed. Students will have the opportunity to assess their current health status and identify potential risk factors.
WEL 100L: Wellness LabWeb1Erin Nielsen
This laboratory experience applies wellness concepts taught in WEL 100 lecture. Students will gain a level of understanding about ones personal fitness level as well as learn a variety of skills to enhance personal wellness.
WEL 100L: Wellness LabWeb1Ken Prorok
This laboratory experience applies wellness concepts taught in WEL 100 lecture. Students will gain a level of understanding about one's personal fitness level as well as learn a variety of skills to enhance personal wellness.