Summer 2014 Undergraduate Online Courses

DSU home  |  Extended Programs  | Registration Request Form | WebAdvisor | Desire2Learn

 

Summer 2014 Drop/Add and Withdraw Dates

Tuition and Fees are due by the first day of class. 

Payment or a payment plan is required to avoid cancellation of registration and late fee assessment.

 

Summer 2014 Sessions

Last day to drop for 100% refund or add a course(s)

Last day to drop a class or withdraw from all courses in a session (70% completion) and receive a grade of W NO REFUND

Full 12 weeks

May 19 August 8

May 26

July 16

1st 6 weeks

May 19 June 27

May 22

June 16

2nd 6 weeks

June 30 August 8

July 3

July 28

Summer 2014 Undergraduate Courses       View Graduate Courses
course titlemodehrsinstructor
ACCT 210: Principles of Accounting I (June 30-August 8)Web3Derek Franken
A study of fundamental accounting principles and procedures such as journalizing, posting, preparation of financial statements, and other selected topics. Accounting is emphasized as a service activity designed to provide the information about economic entities that is necessary for making sound decisions. Prerequisite: 24 semester credits completed or consent of instructor.
ACCT 210: Principles of Accounting I (May 19-June 27)Web3Derek Franken
A study of fundamental accounting principles and procedures such as journalizing, posting, preparation of financial statements, and other selected topics. Accounting is emphasized as a service activity designed to provide the information about economic entities that is necessary for making sound decisions. Prerequisite: 24 semester credits completed or consent of instructor.
ACCT 211: Principles of Accounting II (June 30-August 8)Web3Derek Franken
A continuation of ACCT 210 with emphasis on partnership and corporate structures, management decision-making, cost control, and other selected topics. . Prerequisite: ACCT 210
ACCT 211: Principles of Accounting II (May 19-June 27)Web3Derek Franken
A continuation of ACCT 210 with emphasis on partnership and corporate structures, management decision-making, cost control, and other selected topics. . Prerequisite: ACCT 210
ART 111: Drawing I (May 19-June 27)Web3Alan Montgomery
The investigation of drawing and drawing media and associated concepts and trends.
ART 121: Design I - 2D (May 19-June 27)Web3Alan Montgomery
Emphasizes the organization of visual elements and principles while exploring creative thought processes through art theory, concepts, materials, and techniques.
ART 122: Design II - Color (June 30-August 8)Web3Joseph Staudenbaur
Introduction to color theory as it applies to basic 2D and 3D design principles. Prerequisite: ART 121
ARTD 282: 2-Dimentional Design on Computers I (June 30-August 8)Web3Joseph Staudenbaur
Introduction to and application of computer generated images. Prerequisite: ART 121 and CSC 105
ARTH 100: Art Appreciation (June 30-August 8)Web3Scott Mackenzie
Explores the nature of art in various aesthetic, formal, and psychological dimensions, involving analysis of art objects for understanding, enjoyment, and life enhancement.
ARTH 212: History of World Art II (June 30-August 8)Web3Scott Mackenzie
Art and architecture in the historical and contextual development the role of visual art; including crafts, drawing, painting, sculpture, and architecture; in the historical and cultural development of world civilization from the renaissance through the 20th century.
BADM 220: Business Statistics (May 19-June 27)Web3Dan Talley
This course introduces students to basic statistical methods. Otpics, with computer applications, unclude: descriptive statistics, probability, distributions, sampling, estimation and index numbers with emphasis on applications in business and economics. Prerequisite: MATH 102
BADM 310: Business Finance (June 30-August 8)Web3Randall Harkless
Business finance is an overview of financial theory including the time value of money, capital budgeting, capital structure theory, divident policies, asset pricing, risk and return, the efficient markets hypothesis, bond and stock valuation, business performance evaluation and other financial topics. Prerequisite: ACCT 211
BADM 344: Managerial Communications (May19-August 8)Web3TBA
This advanced writing course is designed to assist students with the development and refinement of their communication skills. It stresses the factors underlying the composition of managerial communications, including organizational structure, reader analysis, and content quality for letters and memoranda, informational and analytical reports, and grant proposals. Prerequisite: CSC 105
BADM 344: Managerial Communications (June 30-August 8)Web3 Lynette Molstad-Gorder
This advanced writing course is designed to assist students with the development and refinement of their communication skills. It stresses the factors underlying the composition of managerial communications, including organizational structure, reader analysis, and content quality for letters and memoranda, informational and analytical reports, and grant proposals. Prerequisite: CSC 105
BADM 350: Legal Environment of Business (May 19-June 27)Web3Brian Ahrendt
This is a study of legal topics as they apply to the buisness environment. Topics include an introduction to the law, the U.S. Court System, legal process, government regulation, and criminal, tort, and contract issues.
BADM 360: Organization and Management (May 19-June 27)Web3Zixing Shen
This course is a study of management, including the planning, directing, controlling and coordinating of the various activities involved in operating a business enterprise.
BADM 370: Marketing (May 19-June 27)Web3Deb Tech
This course introduces the student to the basic concepts and practices of modern marketing. Topics include marketing and its linkages to business, consumer behavior, marketing research, strategy and planning, product and pricing decisions, distribution and promotion decisions, marketing management, and evaluation and control aspects for both consumer and industrial goods.
BADM 405: International Trade and Finance (May 19-June 26)Web3Dan Talley
A study of current theory, policy, and practice in international trade and finance. Prerequisities: BADM 310, BADM 370 and ECON 202
BADM 435: Management of Technology and Innovation (May 19-June 27)Web3Zixing Shen
The inderstanding and management of the technological and innovative processes in business, industry and government. Prerequisite: BADM 360
BADM 460: Human Resource Management (May 19-June 27)Web3Jack Walters
This course provides a survey of managerial practices with respect ot the management of the human resource function and an introduction to the topic of human resource, management as an occupational choice. Major areas of inquiry include recruitment and selection, training and development, compensation and benefits administration and work force integration and maintenance. Prerequisite: BADM 360
BADM 475: Consumer Behavior (May 19 - June 27)Web3Deb Tech
This course is a study of the various factors that influence consumers in their decisions relative to buying, using and disposing of goods, services and ideas. The course examines concepts and theories from the behavioral sciences and analyzes their application in developing marketing strategies. Prerequisites: BADM 370
BADM 476: Marketing Research (May 19-August 8)Web3Cecelia Wittmayer
This course provides an in-depth study of the primary methodologies of marketing research. Emphasis is placed on collecting, analyzing, interpreting and presenting information for the purpose of reducing uncertainty surrounding marketing and management decision. Prerequisite: CSC 209, BADM 370 and BADM 220 or MATH 281
BADM 482: Business Policy and Strategy (June 30-August 8)Web3Rick Christoph
This course is designed to develop an understanding of strategy formulation, implementation, and evaluation. It involves integrating all functional area of business, analyzing the environment in which the firm operates, and choosing strategies that enable the firm to meet its objectives. Prerequisites: BADM 310, BADM 350, BADM 360, BADM 370, senior standing.
BIOL 165: General Zoology (May 19-June 27)Web4Dale Droge
A phylogenetic approach to the study of animal diversity emphasizing evolutionary relationships and structure and function of animal systems. Includes significant weekly laboratory exercises. Prerequisite: BIOL 101 or BIOL 151.
BIOL 165L: General Zoology (May 19-June 27)Web0Dale Droge
A phylogenetic approach to the study of animal diversity emphasizing evolutionary relationships and structure and function of animal systems. Includes significant weekly laboratory exercises.
BIOL 323: Human Anatomy and Physiology (May 19-June 27)Web4Nevine Nawar
Study of the structure and function of the human body including interrelationships among body systems. Includes significant weekly laboratory exercises. Prerequisite: BIOL 101 or BIOL 151. BIOL 323 Lab is required.
BIOL 323L: Human Anatomy and Physiology (May19-June 27)Web0Nevine Nawar
Laboratory experience that accompanies BIOL 323.
CIS 130: Visual Basic Programming (May 19-June 27)Web3Jim McKeown
Fundamentals of programming using Visual Basic. Focus on problem solving, visual design and programming concepts. Topics include sequence, selection, repetition, procedures and functions.
CIS 245: Information Security Fundamentals (May 19-August 8)Web3TBA
Introductory course in which students explore the principles of information assurance, with emphasis on current threats and vulnerabilities to develop an information security plan to mitigate risk. Information security and assurance issues are explored and a multidisciplinary approach is discussed that examines security policies, models, and mechanisms for confidentiality, integrity, and availability. Theory/lab
CIS 245: Information Security Fundamentals (May 19-August 8)Web3Kyle Cronin
Introductory course in which students explore the principles of information assurance, with emphasis on current threats and vulnerabilities to develop an information security plan to mitigate risk. Information security and assurance issues are explored and a multidisciplinary approach is discussed that examines security policies, models, and mechanisms for confidentiality, integrity, and availability. Theory/Lab.
CIS 251: Business Applications Programming (June 30-August 8)Web3Jim McKeown
Emphasis on logical design and structured programming techniques. Writing, debugging and testing business programs. Prerequisite: CIS 130.
CIS 275: Web Application Programming I (May 19-August 8)Web3Rob Honomichl
An introduction to the languages used to develop and operate e-commerce sites with focus on client-side technologies. Topics include but are not limited to programming practices, HTML, extensible markup language (XML), JavaScript. Prequisite: Completion of any two of the following courses: CIS 130, CIS 251, CSC 150, CSC 250.
CIS 325: Management Information Systems (May 19-June 27)Web3Lee Threadgold
Introduction to the application of information technology in organizations, roles of managers and staff professionals in developing and using information systems with current and future technology.
CIS 328: Operating Environments (May 19-August 8)Web3Brent Tulloss
This course examines the role of the operating system in computer operations. Current operating environments including Windows NT, Unix, and similar operating environments are studied from a theoretical and hands-on perspective. Prerequisite: CIS 350.
CIS 332: Structured Systems Analysis and Design (May 19-August 8)Web3Wayne Pauli
Skills in structured system analysis techniques used to define information systems solutions to business problems by producing detailed systems specifications. Prerequisite: CSC 150 or CIS 130
CIS 350: Computer Hardware, Data Communications and Networking (May 19-August 8)Web3TBA
An introduction to computer hardware, data communications, and networking fundamentals and theory. Computer design, components, voice and data communications and LAN design and operation issues are addressed in both lecture and hands-on formats. Emphasis is given to network design using the OSI model as well as network operations and setup issues.
CIS 363: Hrdwre/Virtualization/Data Com (May 19-August 8)Web3Kyle Cronin
This course will provide students with a broad understanding of computer hardware, computer architecture, virtualization, and data communications.
CIS 384: Decision Support Systems (May 19-June 27)Web3Zixing Shen
A study of the decision process, including the garthering, analysis and application of data. Decision Support Systems (DSS) represents a point of view on the role of the computer in the decision-making process. Decision support implies the use of computers to: assist managers in their decision making, support rather than replace managerial judgment, and improve the effectiveness of decision making rather than just its efficiency. The course covers the tools, techniques, and theory of DSS and how they can be used to improve the quality of management decisions. Prerequisite: Junior Standing.
CIS 385: Networking II (May 19-August 8)Web3Brent Tulloss
This class focuses on the technical networking essentials of the development, maintenance and use of e-commerce sites. Topics include coverage of network concepts and theory, intranets, extranets, server issues, enterprise computing, virtual hosting, and security considerations. Prerequisite: CSC 105 and CIS 130 or CSC 150.
CIS 387: Routing and Switching (May 19-August 8)Web3Michael Ham
Students will learn to design, configure, implement and troubleshoot LAN/WAN network technologies using up-to-date routers and switches. The class will incorporate lectures, assignments, and hands-on lab projects using modern routing equipment. Students will learn to analyze business needs and recommend appropriate network and routing solutions regardless of the network size or complexity. Students will be exposed to a wide variety of routing and switching topics. Prerequisite(s): CIS 385
CIS 388: Computer Forensics Fundatmentals (May 19-August 8)Web3Ashley Podhradsky
Identifying, preserving, extracting, and examining data from computers. Prerequisite: CIS 350 or 363
CIS 462: Unix/Linus Administration (May 19-August 8)Web3Brent Tulloss
This course prepares students to perform basic system administration, networking, and security-oriented tasks on UNIX/Linux-based servers. This course has a significant hands-on component that utilizes both the command line and graphical user interface (GUI) environments. Topics include the vi editor, shell scripting, process management, file system management, network configuration, use account management, and troubleshooting. Prerequisite: CIS 385.
CSC 105: Introduction to Computers (May 19-August 8)Web3Chris Olson
Overview of computer applications with the emphasis on word processing, spreadsheets, database, presentation tools and Internet-based applications.
CSC 105: Introduction to Computers (May 19-June 27)Web3Pam Rowland
Overview of computer applications with the emphasis on word processing, spreadsheets, database, presentation tools and Internet-based applications.
CSC 123: Problem Solving & Programming (May 19-August 8)Web3Kathy Engbrecht
An introduction to problem solving and computer programming. Students will learn essential problem solving techniques. This class uses engaging environments (such as web scripting or visual programming) to introduce programming concepts and logic. Students will create interactive applications to learn techniques on using a computer to solve problems and the fundamental constructs that are used in computer programs.
CSC 150: Computer Science I (May 19-August 8)Web3Kyle Cronin
An introduction to computer programming. Focus on problem solving, algorithm development, design, and programming concepts. Topics include sequence, selection, repetition, functions, and arrays.
CSC 150: Computer Science I (May 19-August 8)Web3Rob Honomichl
An introduction to computer programming. Focus on problem solving, algorithm development, design, and programming concepts. Topics include sequence, selection, repetition, functions, and arrays.
CSC 206: Advanced Computer Apps: Advanced Word (May 19-June 27)Web1Pam Rowland
The use of specific computer applications such as operating systems, word processing, spreadsheets, databases, graphics, integrated packages, communications packages and hardware topics. Prerequisite: CSC 105.
CSC 207: Adv Comp Apps: Spreadsheet (June 30-August 8)Web1Pam Rowland
This course covers use of advanced features in a common spreadsheet application. Prerequisite: CSC 105
CSC 208: Adv Comp Apps: Database (June 30-August 8)Web1Pam Rowland
This course covers use of advanced features in a common database application. Prerequisite: CSC 105
CSC 250: Computer Science II (May 19-August 8)Web3TBA
Problem solving, algorithm design, standards of program style, debugging and testing. Extension of the control structures and data structures of the high-level language introduced in CSC 150 . Elementary data structures and basic algorithms that include sorting and searching. Topics include more advanced treatment of functions, data types such as arrays and structures, and files. Prerequisite(s): CSC 150
CSC 250: Computer Science II (May 19-August 8)Web3Kyle Cronin
Problem solving, algorithm design, standards of program style, debugging and testing. Extension of the control structures and data structures of the high-level language introduced in CSC 150 . Elementary data structures and basic algorithms that include sorting and searching. Topics include more advanced treatment of functions, data types such as arrays and structures, and files. Prerequisite(s): CSC 150
CSC 314: Assembly Language (May 19-August 8)Web3Matt Miller
A thorough introduction to assembly language programming and processor architecture. A study of low-level programming techniques, and the layout of a typical computer. The student will gain insight into the memory layout, registers, run-time stack, and global data segment of a running program. Prerequisite: CSC 250.
EDFN 338: Foundations of American Ed (May 19-June 27)Web2Tim Fiegen
A survey of the goals, history, organization, and philosophy of pre-K-12 American education, with emphasis on teaching as a profession; contemporary issues and practices, legal and ethical responsibilities, and attributes of effective teachers. Includes a Level I field experience.
EDFN 365: Computer-Based Technology & Learning (May 19-August 8)Web3Mark Geary
Prepares students to integrate computers into the curriculum by exploring the evolving uses and expectations of technolgy as a teaching and learning tool. Course objectives based on ISTE standards. Admission to Teacher Education
EDFN 475: Human Relations (May 19-August 8)Web3Gabe Mydland
Focuses on characteristics, contributions, and strengths of a pluralistic society; various cultural perspectives and specific information about cultures; the dehumanizing impact of biases and negative stereotypes; and the human relations approach to teaching.
ELED 412: Kindergarten Education (May 12-May 30)Web3Crystal Pauli
An overview of the principles and philosophy of kindergarten education as it relates to curriculum planning and the development of activities and materials. Course utilizes NAEYC curriculum standards. Level III field experience fee assessed.
ENGL 101: Composition I (May 19-June 27)Web3Justin Blessinger
Practice in the skills, research, and documentation needed for effective academic writing. Analysis of a variety of academic and non-academic texts, rhetorical structures, critical thinking, and audience will be included. A library research component will be included. Some coursework incorporates multimedia assignments. Prerequisite: Appropriate placement based on entry-level assessment of successful completion of appropriate placement.
ENGL 201: Composition II (June 30-August 8)Web3Justin Blessinger
Study of and practice in writing persuasive prose, with the aim to improve writing skills in all disciplines. A library research component will be included. Prerequisite: ENGL 101 or consent of instructor and a minimum of 28 credit hours completed.
ENGL 201: Composition II (May 19-June 27)Web3Shreelina Ghosh
Study of and practice in writing persuasive prose, with the aim to improve writing skills in all disciplines. A library research component will be included. Prerequisite: ENGL 101 or consent of instructor and a minimum of 28 credit hours completed.
ENGL 208: Documentation and Presentation (June 30-August 8)Web3John Nelson
Principles of clear description and documentation of computer programs and systems, and methods of preparing oral presentations. Prerequisite: ENGL 101, CSC 105.
ENGL 210: Introduction to Literature (June 30-August 8)Web3John Nelson
Readings in fiction, drama and poetry to acquaint students with literature and aesthetic form. Prerequisite: ENGL 101 or consent of instructor
EPSY 210: Lifespand Development (May 19-August 8)Web3Gabe Mydland
Study of the changes that take place during an individual's life, from conception until death. Emphases placed on theory, psychosocial, biosocial, and cognitive development.
EPSY 302: Educational Psychology (May 19-June 27)Web3Mark Hawkes
A comprehensive study of the fundamental psychological facts, principles and theories that apply to the nature of the learner and the learning process. Includes a Level I field experience.
GEOG 200: Intro to Human Geography (May 19-June 27)Web3Karie Forbes-Boyte
Systematic study of world culture from perspective of five integrating themes: cultural region, cultural diffusion, cultural ecology, cultural integration, and cultural landscape. Topics include population, agriculture, political and economic systems, religion and language, folk and popular culture, and ethnicity.
HIST 151: United States History I (May 19-June 27)Web3Kurt Kemper
Surveys the background and development of the United States from its colonial origins to the Civil War and Resconstruction.
HIST 152: United States History II (June 30-August 8)Web3Kurt Kemper
surveys development of the United States since the Civil War and Reconstruction
HLTH 320: Community Health (June 30-August 8)Web3Erin Nielsen
This course presents the structural organization, functional roles, and political foundations of public and private helath agencies relative to community health. The roles and responsibilities of community health educators and professional associations/career opportunities receive particular attention. Prerequisite: WEL 100
HLTH 370: Stress Management (May 19-August 8)Web3Scott Staiger
The course is designed to help students deal with stressful situations in their lives. Successful management of stress has been shown to positively affect the performance of daily tasks and reduce the risks of many diseases. Students will learn management techniques and have the opportunity to act as peer counselors.
HLTH 422: Nutrition (May 19-June 27)Web3Scott Staiger
This course investigates the science of food relative to human performance, nutrition, and health education. Areas of emphasis include nutrient chemistry, function, and interactions; energy consumption and metabolism; and resources for nutrition education.
INED 211: SD American Indian Culture/Ed (May 19-June 27)Web3Kevin Krahenbuhl
This course is an education-focused study of the history, culture, values, family structures, traditional religions, legends, and governmental policies of South Dakota American Indian groups. Students are expected to apply the selected concepts and theories to contemporary issues in the state and region. Areas addressed include the educational application of American Indian cultural dynamics, history, teaching, and learning.
INED 411: South Dakota Indian Studies (May 19-June 27)Web3Matt Nelson
A basic knowledge of Indian history wth emphasis on the Lakota, Dakota and Nakota speaking peoples. Current cultural issues are presented including values, familly structures, tradtional religion, fine arts, legends, economics, governments polidies, treaties, acts and related areas. Focuses on teaching mmethods, content and materials to equip students to teach respev,,,,,,,,,,
LART 110: Language Arts (June 30-August 8)Web3TBA
Building reading speed and developing better comprehension, vocabulary, and general study skills. Each time the course is offered, there will be a specific indication of its focus (such as "reading" or "Study Skills").
MATH 095: Pre-College Algebra (May 19-Aug 8)Web3Kelly Stienmetz
This course prepares students for college level mathematics. Topics include basic properties of real numbers, exponents & radicals, rectangular coordinate geometry, solutions to linear and quadratic equations, systems of equations, inequalities, polynomials, factoring, rational expressions and equations, radical expressions and equations, and an introduction to functions such as polynomial, exponential and logarithmic functions. Note: This is remedial level course. No credit for MATH 095 will be granted for graduation.
MATH 101: Intermediate Algebra (June 30-Aug 8)Web3TBA
Basic properties of real numbers, linear equations and inequalities, quadratic equations, systems of equations, polynomials and factoring, rational expressions and equations, and radical expressions and equations, and an introduction to functions such as polynomial, exponential and logarithmic functions. Credit for MATH 101 will not be granted to anyone who has previously received credit for MATH 102. Prerequisite: Appropriate Mathematics Placement. Note: Students must earn a grade of "C" or better to meet the prerequisite for MATH 102.
MATH 101: Intermediate Algebra (May 19-June 27)Web3Kim Jones
Basic properties of real numbers, linear equations and inequalities, quadratic equations, systems of equations, polynomials and factoring, rational expressions and equations, and radical expressions and equations, and an introduction to functions such as polynomial, exponential and logarithmic functions. Credit for MATH 101 will not be granted to anyone who has previously received credit for MATH 102. Prerequisite: Appropriate Mathematics Placement. Note: Students must earn a grade of "C" or better to meet the prerequisite for MATH 102.
MATH 102: College Algebra (June 30-August 8)Web3TBA
Equations and inequalities; polynomial functions and graphs; exponents, radicals, binomial theorem, zeros of polynomials; systems of equations; exponential, logarithmic, and inverse functions, applications and graphs. Other topics selected from sequences, series, and complex numbers. Prerequisite: MATH 101 (with a grade of "C" or better) or appropriate math placement.
MATH 102: College Algebra (May 19-June 27)Web3Kim Jones
Equations and inequalities; polynomial functions and graphs; exponents, radicals, binomial theorem, zeros of polynomials; systems of equations; exponential, logarithmic, and inverse functions, applications and graphs. Other topics selected from sequences, series, and complex numbers. Prerequisite: MATH 101 (with a grade of "C" or better) or appropriate math placement.
MATH 121: Survey of Calculus (May 19-June 27)Web4Rich Avery
A survey of calculus including an intuitive approach to limits, continuity, differentiation, and integration with an emphasis on applications of the derivative and the integral as well as topics from multivariable calculus. Prerequisite: MATH 102 or appropriate math placement.
MATH 123: Calculus I (May 19 - August 8)Web4Kelly Steinmetz
The study of limits, continuity, derivatives, applications of the derivative, antiderivatives, the definite and indefinite integral, and the fundamental theorem of calculus. Prerequisite(s): MATH 102 or MATH 115 or MATH 120 or determined by Board of Regent placement policy.
MATH 201: Intro to Discrete Math (May 19-Aug 8)Web3Kailee Gray
An introduction and overview of discrete mathematics. Topics to be selected from other number bases, modular arithmetic, recursion, elementary logic, set theory, matrix operations, linear programming, numerical methods and discrete probability with computer applications. Prerequisite: MATH 102
MATH 281: Introduction to Statistics (June 30-August 8)Web3Jeff Palmer
A study of descriptive statistics including graphs, measures of central tendency and variability and an introduction to probability theory, sampling and techniques of statistical inference with an emphasis on statistical applications. Prerequisite: MATH 102 or MATH 121 or MATH 123.
MATH 341: Mathematical Concepts for Teachers I (May 19-June 27)Web3Rich Avery
An introduction to sets, numeration systems, arithmetic operations/algorithms, problem solving, and other topics. This course does not satisfy the mathematics general education requirement nor any mathematics area requirements other than those for a degree in elementary education. Prerequisite: MATH 102
MATH 342: Mathematical Concepts for Teachers II (May 19-June 27)Web3Rich Avery
An introduction to geometry concepts, measurement, problem solving, probability, statistics, and other topics. This course does not satisfy the mathematics general education requirement nor any mathematics area requirements other than those for a degree in elementary education. Prerequisite: MATH 102 or MATH 341
MCOM 351: Web Publishing I (June 30-August 8)Web3Dawn Dittman
Basic and intermediate techniques for creating documents for the World Wide Web. Emphasis will be placed on the priniciples of design, using the most recent versions of hyper-text markup language and enhancements. Prior completion of ARTD 282 is strongly recommended.
MCOM 389: Portfolio and Professional Development (May 19-June 27)Web1Shreelina Ghosh
Planning, creation, and production of portfolios and other professional materials.
MLED 300: Survey of Middle Level Education (May 19-June 27)Web1Cotton Koch
A survey of the history, goals, rational, and philosophy of middle level education, with emphasis on how middle level schools best meet the needs of learners in a rapidly changing society. Methods and strategies for effective management, teaming, exploratories, block scheduling, multi-age grouping, and the advisor-advisee program will be examined.
MUS 100: Music Appreciation (May 19-June 27)Web3Dan Mortenson
A non-technical discussion designed to increase the enjoyment and appreciation of music. Fulfills the music requirement in the general education program.
PE 360: K-8 Physical Education Methods (June 30 - August 8)Web2Nilo C. Ramos
In this course, students develop an understanding of the tools of inquiry of K-8 physical education; the ability to design, deliver, and evaluate a variety of instructional strategies and processes that incorporate learning resources, materials, technologies, and state and national curriculum standards appropriate to K-8 physical education; the ability to assess student learning in K-8 physical education; and to apply these knowledge, skills, and attitudes to real life situations and experiences. Prerequisite(s): Admitted to teacher education
PSYC 451: Psych of Abnormal Behavior (May 19-August 8)Web3Gabe Mydland
This course is a comprehensive survey of abnormal personality and behavior. It includes an examination of the origins, symptoms and treatment of psychological disorders.
SEED 450: Reading and Content Literacy (June 30-August 8)Web3Mark Geary
This course explores methods for teaching middle and high school students to read, write, think and learn in ways that allow them to master the subject matter and meaningfully apply their understanding. Participants learn to plan lessons that teach content and nurture greater literacy. Pre-, during-, and post-reading strategies and writing strategies are explored, along with assessment methods that give students a continual view of their literacy progress and achevement. Classroom adaptations for culturally and linguistically diverse populations in the content areas are alos addressed. Prerquisite: Admitted to Teacher Education.
SOC 100: Introduction to Sociology (May 19-June 27)Web3Viki Johnson
Comprehensive study of society, with analysis of group life, and other forces shaping human behavior.
SOC 285: Society & Technology (May 19-June 27)Web3Viki Johnson
Exploring a variety of domestic and global topics relating to technology, society and culture. Prerequisite: CSC 105
SPAN 101: Introductory Spanish I (May 19-June 27)Web4Deb Tech
Introduces the fundamental elements of Spanish sentence structure and vocabulary. Promotes speaking, listening and writing within a curtural context. Classwork may be suppliemented with required aural/oral practice outside of class. No previous study of Spanish required.
SPCM 101: Fundamentals of Speech (June 30-August 8)Web3Michael Lynch
Introduces the study of speech fundamentals and critical thinking through frequent public speaking practice, including setting, purpose, audience, and subject
SPCM 101: Fundamentals of Speech (May 19-June 27)Web3Kelly MacLeod
Introduces the study of speech fundamentals and critical thinking through frequent public speaking practice, including setting, purpose, audience, and subject.
SPED 100: Introduction to Persons with Exceptionalities (May 19-June 27)Web3Sandi Steinhoff-Muller
A survey of the various exceptionalities and implications of education; the history and philosophy of special education; and state and federal legislation affecting special education.
SPED 442: Serv Students Lrng Disabilites (May 19-June 27)Web2Carla J. Miller
Examination of how children evidencing a learning disability or mild mental retardation can have their academic, social/emotional needs met in inclusive settings and/or the more traditional special education setting.
SPED 443: Serving Students with Learning Disabilities Practicum (May 19-June 27)Web1Carla Miller
This field experience is to provide students with the opportunity to become familiar with the special education setting and practice the instructional and behavioral adaptations, modifications, and strategies taught in special education coursework. During the field experience students will demonstrate their ability to make data-based decisions, create and teach lessons linked to assessment, and manage student behavior. Corequisite(s): SPED 442
SPED 460: Family Systems/Professional Collaboration (May 19-June 27)Web2Tim Fiegen
This covers the collaboration and communication skills necessary to work within family systems and the use of resources and services supporting birth through lifespan services, multidisciplinary team functioning, and the placement committee processes. Admission to Teacher Education.
THEA 100: Introduction to Theatre (May 19-June 27)Web3Susan Conover
Introductory course designed to enhance the student's enjoyment and understanding of the theatrical experience. Play readings, films, and demonstrations acquaint the students with the history and techniques of the theatrical art.
THEA 200: Theatre History (June 30-August 8)Web3Kelly Mac Leod
A study oftheatre history as it relates to social, political, and cultural history from the Ancient Greek period upto and including contemporary performance styles and genres.
THEA 201: Film Appreciation (May 19-August 8)Web3Susan Conover
This course explores the art of film and its impact on society. The student explores American and International cultures through the study of their films, filmmaking, and critical analysis.
WEL 100: Wellness for Life (May 19-August 8)Web1Nilo Ramos
This course introduces the importance and holistic nature of the six dimensions of personal wellness and fitness. The course will provide the necessary knowledge and skills to make informed decisions which will lead to the development of a healthy lifestyle. Various issues related to the dimensions of wellness will be discussed. Students will have the opportunity to assess their current health status and identify potential risk factors.
WEL 100: Wellness for Life (May 19-August 8)Web1Ken Prorok
This course introduces the importance and holistic nature of the six dimensions of personal wellness and fitness. The course will provide the necessary knowledge and skills to make informed decisions which will lead to the development of a healthy lifestyle. Various issues related to the dimensions of wellness will be discussed. Students will have the opportunity to assess their current health status and identify potential risk factors.
WEL 100: Wellness for Life (May 19-August 8)Web1TBA
This course introduces the importance and holistic nature of the six dimensions of personal wellness and fitness. The course will provide the necessary knowledge and skills to make informed decisions which will lead to the development of a healthy lifestyle. Various issues related to the dimensions of wellness will be discussed. Students will have the opportunity to assess their current health status and identify potential risk factors.
WEL 100L: Wellness Lab (May 19-August 8)Web1Ken Prorok
This laboratory experience applies wellness concepts taught in WEL 100 lecture. Students will gain a level of understanding about one's personal fitness level as well as learn a variety of skills to enhance personal wellness.
WEL 100L: Wellness Lab (May 19-August 8)Web1Nilo Ramos
This laboratory experience applies wellness concepts taught in WEL 100 lecture. Students will gain a level of understanding about one's personal fitness level as well as learn a variety of skills to enhance personal wellness.